2:00PM Water Cooler 5/21/2019

By Lambert Strether of Corrente.

Politics

“But what is government itself, but the greatest of all reflections on human nature?” –James Madison, Federalist 51

“They had one weapon left and both knew it: treachery.” –Frank Herbert, Dune

2020

“2020 Democratic Presidential Nomination” [] (RCP average of five polls). Sanders (16.3% 18.8%) claws back 1.5% from Biden (39.8% 38.3%), others status quo, as of May 21.

* * *

Biden (D)(1): “The Weapons Industry Lobbyist Advising Joe Biden” []. “Stuart Eizenstat, a long-time player in Democratic politics, is advising Joe Biden’s presidential campaign [on foreign policy]…. As a lawyer and lobbyist at the firm Covington & Burling, Eizenstat has represented fossil fuel companies Shell, BP and Noble Energy, as well as defense contractors Caterpillar, Raytheon, BAE Systems, Boeing and the notorious private security firm Blackwater.”

Gravel (D)(1): I really hope Gravel makes it into the debates:

The Democratic Party's weak-kneed consultant class has brought you nothing but mediocrity and failure: wars, bank bailouts, a government fully owned by corporations. They have no interest in a government for the people. Don't listen to a word these soulless idiots tell you.

— Mike Gravel (@MikeGravel)

Moulton (D)(1): “Moulton roll outs proposal for revamped national service program” []. “Aimed at recruiting young Americans into a national service program, the proposal would provide educational or vocational scholarships in exchange for a service commitment of one to three years by Americans between the ages of 17 and 24. Specifically, Moulton’s plan would cover 60 percent of the cost of in-state college tuition or job-training up to $14,000 for a one-year commitment of national service. That benefit would increase on a sliding scale, covering full in-state tuition or $24,000 in training for a three year commitment from enrollees. ‘I want every American to have an opportunity to serve like I did,’ said Moulton, a former Marine Corps captain who served four tours of duty in Iraq. Now in his third term, the Massachusetts native said in a statement he hopes to give young Americans ‘a chance to confront the challenges our country faces today, be a part of something bigger than themselves, and earn a promise that they will be rewarded for their efforts.'” • And everybody has a share!

Sanders (D)(1): “Walmart workers invited a special guest to crash the company’s annual meeting: Bernie Sanders” []. “The presidential candidate, who has repeatedly called on Walmart to improve its working conditions, is heading to Bentonville, Ark., on June 5 to introduce a shareholders’ proposal that would give hourly Walmart workers a seat on the company’s board… The presidential candidate, who has repeatedly called on Walmart to improve its working conditions, is heading to Bentonville, Ark., on June 5 to introduce a shareholders’ proposal that would give hourly Walmart workers a seat on the company’s board….. ‘We really want Walmart to think about us — the lowly associates who, behind the scenes, are the ones bringing in the money,’ said Davis, who works as certified pharmacy technician in New Bern, N.C…. Davis said she invited Sanders to speak at the shareholders meeting because he has supported workers in their fight for better pay and paid sick leave.” • That’s weird. There are so many real Democrats running I can’t imagine why Davis chose Sanders

Trump (R)(1): “Trump rallies in Pennsylvania ‘deep state’ territory” []. • This is really interesting, on the effects of the crash of TWA Flight 800 on Montoursville, PA.

IA: “The Candidates with a Secret Weapon in Iowa” []. A candidate round-up. This caught my eye. Sanders: “Bernie Sanders arrived back in Iowa this year with essentially a turnkey operation, one built by his insurgent 2016 caucus campaign. Volunteers flooded Sanders’ initial events in Iowa, who in turn signed up new attendees. Sanders already claims 24,000 sign-ups for their Iowa campaign, and they should start packing their field offices as they open them across the state. A recent national organizing launch from the campaign saw over 60 volunteer-led events in Iowa alone. There may be other candidates this year that surge in the Iowa polls closer to caucus night. But each one of those will have precious little time to take advantage of that momentum and use it to lock in precinct captains and volunteers. Sanders already has that infrastructure built, which gives him a big advantage over the rest of the field that is hard to overstate.” And, amazingly enough, Booker: “The Booker family’s roots lay in Buxton, Iowa, the former town where southern blacks and white European immigrants moved to work together in a coal mine…. Close to 80 Booker family members live in Iowa – that alone is enough to swing a few precincts in his favor on caucus night. The campaign has also signed up several already to serve as precinct captains, and the family members, of which at least one is at every local Booker event, already take to calling the Iowa staffers ‘cousins.'” • No signage, though!

Obama Legacy

“It’s Time to Hold American Elites Accountable for Their Abuses” [Rahm Emanuel (!), *]. “[E]ven after being bailed out, the nation’s banking executives never faced any real consequences. No one went to jail. They never had to repay the personal fortunes they’d made by passing out those bad loans. Once again, the middle class was called to bail out the elites who were responsible for the mess while the elites got off scot-free…. As the White House chief of staff, I argued, unsuccessfully, that the American people needed the catharsis of seeing that the bankers who had gotten the country into this mess were being forced to take responsibility—that faith in government would plummet if we failed to deliver some ‘Old Testament justice.'” • I must be dreaming. If this weren’t Rahm Emanuel, I’d swear Obama — and, by extension, Biden — just went under the bus. What gives? NOTE * Emanuel is now a Contributing Editor at The Atlantic….

RussiaGate

“Russian documents reveal desire to sow racial discord — and violence — in the U.S.” [CBS]. Dateline, London: “The documents were obtained through the Dossier Center, a London-based investigative project funded by Russian opposition figure Mikhail Khodorkovsky. NBC News has not independently verified the materials, but forensic analysis by the Dossier Center appeared to substantiate the communications.” • I thought London hadn’t been lit by gas since the Victorian Era. I guess I was wrong…

Impeachment

“Buzz grows Amash will challenge Trump as a Libertarian” []. “There is growing buzz that Rep. Justin Amash (R-Mich.) will leave the Republican Party to mount a challenge against President Trump as the Libertarian Party’s presidential candidate…. Amash has vented about the “two-party duopoly” while leaving the door open to running as a Libertarian.” • The presence of a Republican challenger and a third party run are both Lichtman Presidential keys that work against Trump.

“Why Justin Amash’s impeachment comments probably won’t change Nancy Pelosi’s mind” []. “Pelosi has laid down a marker that she’d need bipartisan support for impeachment. It’s a line she may have purposefully set knowing that Republicans would never get there. One Republican member of Congress doesn’t mean she has Republican support. But now, if impeachment were to happen, this would not be an entirely Democratic exercise, as Trump has tried to cast it. But Amash can be seen as an outcast in the Republican Party…. Now that Amash has taken the first step to say publicly what others in his party are thinking privately, who else may join him? (Notable: Romney’s not one of them. He said Sunday that while Amash made “a courageous statement,” he didn’t agree that the president should be impeached.)”

“‘We’re at an inflection point’: More Dems pressure Pelosi on impeachment” []. “Pelosi and her top deputies announced they will hold a closed-door meeting Wednesday to fully brief members on the House Democrats’ sprawling oversight efforts and investigations — an attempt to mollify the faction of Democrats who have begun to demand more drastic measures against Trump…. Key members of leadership are also backing up the speaker, who worries any impeachment push would distract from the party’s agenda and could backfire politically.” • The “agenda” [snicker] being winning wealthy suburban Republican voters.

What rule of law?

It is just as politicized a maneuver to not impeach in the face of overwhelming evidence as it is to impeach w/o cause.

Congress swore an oath to uphold the Constitution. That includes impeachment.

We have a duty to preserve our institutions + uphold the rule of law.

— Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC)

And which institutions?

Realignment and Legitimacy

“Young Democrats Are Furious Over the DCCC’s Blacklist Punishing Insurgents” []. DCCC Chair Cheri Bustos at College Democrats of Illinois Convention: “The DCCC blacklist inspires particularly strong emotions in Illinois for a reason. It’s here that pro-choice challenger Marie Newman has seen consultants, pollsters, mail firms and a communications group her bid to unseat Lipinski, an eight-term Congress member who vocally opposes abortion. It’s a situation that threatens to become the norm for any insurgent challenger under the policy, as wary vendors steer clear of challengers’ campaigns lest they lose out on the DCCC’s business. ‘I interned at a small political consulting firm, and while they don’t agree with the policy, they have no choice but to go with it,” says Koffsky. “They need the income and to keep their employees employed.’… Sparks says that, after informing the Sanders-aligned group Our Revolution of the boycott, the organization cited the embargo in an April 25 meeting about the blacklist with Bustos in Chicago, in which Our Revolution presented Bustos with a letter criticizing the blacklist. [After agreeing to a meeting,] a member of Bustos’ staff informed him the meeting was off, owing to an Our Revolution press release about the event that led to bad press for Bustos. Balanoff believes the complaint about press is a ‘red herring,’ and Our Revolution and the College Democrats are now deciding on next steps.” • Ha ha. See aletheia33’s comment here for Our Revolution mailer’s on the DCCC blacklist.

Stats Watch

Existing Home Sales, April 2019: “Trends are still improving though existing home sales in April came in below Econoday’s consensus range” [] “Firmness in prices and the rise in supply are two important details that help to offset the weakness in April’s overall rate, and both are likely tied to this year’s pick up in the new home sales market”

Commodities: “An American chemicals company and an Australian miner want to build a new supply chain for rare earths that bypasses China. The plan by Blue Line Corp. and Lynas Corp. is aimed at shoring up supplies of important commodities caught up in the U.S.-China trade conflict, … highlighting how companies are growing more worried about the Washington-Beijing showdown” []. “Production of rare earths is dominated by China, and some of the world’s biggest buyers are U.S. technology companies that use rare earths in a wide range of electronics, including military equipment. The White House has been reluctant to impose tariffs on China’s rare-earths shipments, but China has slapped higher tariffs on American shipments of the unprocessed minerals. Lynas has become the largest producer of rare earths outside China and runs a unique supply chain shipping rare earths from Australia to Malaysia for processing.”

Retail: “Dressbarn is going out of business, plans to shut all 650 stores” [ (DK)]. “Ascena Retail Group said Monday it’s winding down its Dressbarn business and plans to shut all 650 or so of the women’s clothing stores in order to focus on its more profitable brands…. The announcement comes amid a wave of store closures across the country this year. More than 6,000 closures have been announced so far in 2019 by companies ranging from Payless ShoeSource to Gymboree to Charlotte Russe, Victoria’s Secret and Gap. That’s more store closures than in all of 2018, when 5,864 closures were announced over the duration of the entire year, according to a retail real estate tracker by Coresight Research.”

Tech: “Millions of Instagram influencers had their private data scraped and exposed” []. “A massive database containing information of millions of Instagram influencers, celebrities and brand accounts has been found online. The database, hosted by Amazon Web Services, was left exposed and without a password allowing anyone to look inside. At the time of writing, the database had over 49 million records — but was growing by the hour. From a brief review of the data, each record contained public data scraped from influencer Instagram accounts, including their bio, profile picture, the number of followers they have, if they’re verified and their location by city and country, but also contained their private information, such as the Instagram account owner’s email address and phone number…. Facebook, which owns Instagram, said it was looking into the matter.” • Lol.

Transportation: “The U.S. Postal Service is testing self-driving trucks on the long stretches of highway between Phoenix and Dallas, providing a real-world look at new technology that’s drawing growing interest from investors and vehicle makers” []. “The pilot with startup TuSimple will have tractor-trailers haul mail for roughly 1,000 miles each way between distribution centers, providing the kind of predictable and closed-loop operation that developers believe should be ideal for autonomous trucks. ” • If you consider a snow-free environment “the real world.” More importantly, note that “predictable and closed-loop operation” has suddenly become the norm. Farewell, Level 5! As I said from the beginning: If the programmers can’t fix the algorithm, they’ll control their inputs. And here we are! In essence, Silicon Valley has reinvented the train. That may be a good thing, but it’s not what was promised.

Rapture Index: Closes up one on food supply. “The Central U.S. is very wet and cold; with late planting for crops” []. Record High, October 10, 2016: 189. Current: 183. Remember that bringing on the rapture is a good thing. (It’s been awhile since I looked at the Rapture Index; it’s still hovering just above the 180 floor.

The Biosphere

“Global change microbiology — big questions about small life for our future” []. “The story of the evolution of life on Earth and its biogeochemical functions is foremost a story of unicellular life, rising before 3.8 billion years ago, and shaping Earth ever since. The core functions of microorganisms, including hydrogen oxidation and production, CO2 and N2 fixation, methanogenesis and methanotrophy, photosynthesis and more, enable them to support complex ecosystems sustainably using sunlight, water, air and minerals. These ingenious core functions are enabled by a set of ancient enzymes with genetic codes1 that have survived major catastrophic events during Earth’s history, including giant meteorite impacts, extreme hot and icy eras of Earth, the rise of oxygen and the global colonization of land and water by plant and animal life. The replication and survival of the microbial core gene set is supported by a huge, yet unknown, diversity of host systems that provide for the adaptation to environmental dynamics, comprising potentially a billion taxa…. What we urgently need to find out is whether microorganisms provide solutions to our non-sustainable use of antibiotics and pesticides, which have become severe global problems to nature and humans alike, and whether microorganisms could be part of the solution in the quest for sustainable energies and in the remediation of habitats, as well as our and our planet’s health.” • Somehow I doubt this is in Inslee’s plan.

Health Care

“The Ethical Quandary in Health Care Reform” []. “How can health care be made affordable for everyone in the United States, given the country’s preferential economic philosophy of free markets? … [I]t is unlikely that the American health care system will ever be completely socialized. Similar to the health system in Canada, it will likely be a system that combines public and private funding options for health care. Given the country’s value system, a system where people are free to choose will likely prevail. In addition, for those who seek exclusivity or services that are costlier than usual, paying extra would be an acceptable option as well.”

“78% Consider Online Medical Sites Reliable” []. “Seventy-eight percent (78%) of voters nationwide believe online medical information is at least somewhat reliable. A ScottRasmussen.com national survey found that total includes 13% who think it is Very Reliable. Not surprisingly, then, 74% visit medical websites to learn about possible causes when they have unfamiliar medical symptoms. However, 77% of Americans say they would rather see a doctor in person than online.” And now the policy implications:

It seems reasonable to think that attitudes about telemedicine could change thanks to the long wait times and costs Americans are facing to see a doctor in person. . Then, it takes two hours out of the day to spend just 20 minutes with the physician. That’s because a typical visit involves 101 minutes in the waiting room and travel time. People living in remote rural areas may have to set aside even more time. Meanwhile, the cost of seeing a doctor has made a real impact on a significant number of American voters. . The survey found that this jumps to 47% among those earning less than $75,000 annually.

Average figures conceal triage, of course (at least in Canada). It’s hard to imagine that wait time would be 101 minutes without the insane health insurance company paperwork; ditto costs.

Guillotine Watch

“How San Francisco broke America’s heart” [ (DK)]. “Who can live on $15 an hour in this city transformed by innovation?… Downtown is a theme park of seismic start-ups — Uber, Airbnb, Slack and Lyft, with Twitter in the nearby Tenderloin, every app a skyscraper.” • What WaPo doesn’t and perhaps cannot (***cough*** Jeff Bezos ***cough***) say, is that Uber, Lyft, and AirBnB are all poster children for regulatory arbitrage, Uber and Lyft are not and never will be profitable, and that Uber is run by crooks. So the skyscrapers are built on fraud. Such are the “” areas that power liberal Democrats.

Class Warfare

“The Conditions of Labor in China” [David Harvey, (kaguve1)]. Important:

Sounds like there’s a big market in China for anti-union consulting firms, a field in which the United States is world-class. I’m sure if Trump understand this, he would be happy to accomodate Xi in this aspect of importing professional services.

“Many More Students, Especially the Affluent, Get Extra Time to Take the SAT” []. “At Scarsdale High School north of New York City, one in five students is eligible for extra time or another accommodation such as a separate room for taking the SAT or ACT college entrance exam. At Weston High School in Connecticut, it is one in four. At Newton North High School outside Boston, it’s one in three.” • They claim learning disabilities. In a lot of ways, this form of corruption is far worse than Varsity Blue. Not only is it far more pervasive, it perverts a system meant to help those who are genuinely disabled. “Accommodation,” forsooth. I bet there’s not one single minute these kids haven’t been “accommodated” in one way or another, all their lives. And all those Ivy League high flyers in the political class…. I wonder how many of them gamed the system this way?

News of the Wired

“The Hidden Heroines of Chaos” []. • As usual with Quanta, this article is almost impossible to extract. The best I can do is quote the teaser: “Ellen Fetter and Margaret Hamilton were responsible for programming the enormous 1960s-era computer that would uncover strange attractors and other hallmarks of chaos theory.” • Holy moley, ! Yes, this Margaret Hamilton:

As NASA's first-ever software engineer, Margaret Hamilton wrote the code by hand that took us to the moon .🚀🌙

— MAKERS (@MAKERSwomen)

When I was a teenager, I read James Watson’s The Double Helix, which was given to my mother by her best friend. I noted Watson’s animus and poor treatment of Rosalind Franklin, but made nothing of it. Only later in life has it occurred to me that my mother’s friend might have given the book for a reason; they were both university wives, after all, besides being writers. Hamilton does have a Medal of Freedom, but where’s the statue? Is she even on a stamp?

* * *
Readers, feel free to me at lambert [UNDERSCORE] strether [DOT] corrente [AT] yahoo [DOT] com, with (a) links, and even better (b) sources I should curate regularly, (c) how to send me a check if you are allergic to PayPal, and (d) to find out how to send me images of plants. Vegetables are fine! Fungi are deemed to be honorary plants! If you want your handle to appear as a credit, please place it at the start of your mail in parentheses: (thus). Otherwise, I will anonymize by using your initials. See the previous Water Cooler (with plant) here. Today’s plant (Eureka Springs):

Eureka Springs: “Redbud over intoxicating lilac. Just twenty feet from my dining room chair where I sip morning coffee and read Cfdtrade. Extended duration of heavy blooms this year. Dramatic reduction in butterflies with no honey bees at all. I live five miles as the crow flies from the nearest cell tower.” I’m a sucker for masses of color in the garden, so wow! And thanks for the (sad) report on pollinators, too. (; it rings true — insects didn’t evolve in a bath of electromagnetic radiation, being protected by the atmosphere, so it stands to reason they’re at least vulnerable. I wish I had better studies…

* * *
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About Lambert Strether

Readers, I have had a correspondent characterize my views as realistic cynical. Let me briefly explain them. I believe in universal programs that provide concrete material benefits, especially to the working class. Medicare for All is the prime example, but tuition-free college and a Post Office Bank also fall under this heading. So do a Jobs Guarantee and a Debt Jubilee. Clearly, neither liberal Democrats nor conservative Republicans can deliver on such programs, because the two are different flavors of neoliberalism (“Because markets”). I don’t much care about the “ism” that delivers the benefits, although whichever one does have to put common humanity first, as opposed to markets. Could be a second FDR saving capitalism, democratic socialism leashing and collaring it, or communism razing it. I don’t much care, as long as the benefits are delivered. To me, the key issue — and this is why Medicare for All is always first with me — is the tens of thousands of excess “deaths from despair,” as described by the Case-Deaton study, and other recent studies. That enormous body count makes Medicare for All, at the very least, a moral and strategic imperative. And that level of suffering and organic damage makes the concerns of identity politics — even the worthy fight to help the refugees Bush, Obama, and Clinton’s wars created — bright shiny objects by comparison. Hence my frustration with the news flow — currently in my view the swirling intersection of two, separate Shock Doctrine campaigns, one by the Administration, and the other by out-of-power liberals and their allies in the State and in the press — a news flow that constantly forces me to focus on matters that I regard as of secondary importance to the excess deaths. What kind of political economy is it that halts or even reverses the increases in life expectancy that civilized societies have achieved? I am also very hopeful that the continuing destruction of both party establishments will open the space for voices supporting programs similar to those I have listed; let’s call such voices “the left.” Volatility creates opportunity, especially if the Democrat establishment, which puts markets first and opposes all such programs, isn’t allowed to get back into the saddle. Eyes on the prize! I love the tactical level, and secretly love even the horse race, since I’ve been blogging about it daily for fourteen years, but everything I write has this perspective at the back of it.

133 comments

    1. Expat2uruguay

      I donated 4:20, and I would encourage others to do so. Receiving a donation of $1 actually cost more of the campaign then the dollar they get.
      Also, and I say this to Lambert, getting Mike Gravel into the debates is nowhere near the same thing as getting the guys who write the tweets into the debates. Sadly that’s not in the realm of possibility. Mike Gravel himself has said that he’s not sure if he retains the mental abilities to perform on a debate stage and if he fails what message does that send about his ideas? I’m afraid the Twitter account is as good as this campaign is going to get. But that’s pretty damn good!

      Reply
      1. jrs

        I wonder about the message sent getting people who really aren’t serious in the debates. I mean you could say that about any long shot candidate, fair enough.

        However, Gravel has specifically said he does not want to be President and will withdraw, doesn’t really have proposals, and who knows what connection his writers have with him. That’s an additional level of unserious. I’m feeling like I’m living in Steve Martin’s Roxanne at this point. We are at the point of having social media meme candidates.

        Reply
        1. Mo's Bike Shop

          I’m still inspired by Paul Paulsen. I doubt I’ll watch any debates. ‘Video’ is moving towards sniffing glue for me as a pastime.

          And I’m beginning to express my mom’s inability to sit through a movie.

          Reply
      2. Lambert Strether Post author

        > getting Mike Gravel into the debates is nowhere near the same thing as getting the guys who write the tweets into the debates

        True. We’ll just have to hope he can rise to the occasion.

        Reply
    2. Roger Smith

      Can anyone clarify whether multiple donations from the same person count towards the total required?

      Reply
      1. Christopher Fay

        I gave the 4.20 to Gavel and will do so again. And I gifted the nominal $27 to Warren. Perhaps I should give to Tulsi. Sanders already 2 x 27.

        Reply
  1. JohnnyGL

    Interesting to see the consensus of opinions featured here goes hard on the wealthy and much easier on the world’s poor as far as who’s burden it is to make changes to preserve the current planetary climate.

    Shorter consensus: “stop yelling at poor people to stop having kids and ground the private jets!”

    Reply
    1. Joe Well

      >>stop yelling at poor people to stop having kids and ground the private jets!

      That needs to be on bumper stickers. If people still used bumper stickers. Whatever the current iteration of bumper stickers is.

      Reply
      1. Oregoncharles

        I still see bumper stickers. More people see those than anything else an individual can do. Probably not very persuasive, but at least out there.

        That’s a great line, but too long for a bumper sticker.

        Reply
    2. Craig H.

      More than one person I know thinks the people at Davos and Bilderberg and Bohemian Grove look at this chart and they intend to destroy a whole lot of us useless eaters by any means necessary. I am not that nihilistic.

      Reply
  2. Joe Well

    No, Congressman Moulton, I did not serve my country by invading someone else’s country and killing their people and burning through my country’s money like it was tissue paper in an oil fire, thank you very much for your service, sir.

    Who else thinks that pushing back on this BS veteran veneration is not in fact as politically toxic as we are supposed to believe? Didn’t Trump prove that with his comments on McCain?

    Reply
    1. Arizona Slim

      In my not-so-humble opinion, we need more than a Marine Corps. We need a Climate Corps.

      And, while we’re at it, how about a Green Force? Think of it as the Mother Earth lovin’, tree huggin’, and ground-based answer to the Air Force.

      Reply
      1. Jonathan Holland Becnel

        Green Force is an excellent idea.

        Mayb all the worlds citizens could be eligible.

        Turn the World into Gumbo.

        Reply
  3. A Chicagoan

    Just Wow to “It’s Time to Hold American Elites Accountable for Their Abuses” By Rahm Emanual

    With the subhead line “If Democrats want to address simmering middle-class anger, they need to deliver justice.”

    This is the same Rahm who made 18 millions dollars in two years as an investment banker…() 🤔

    He just left office this week so lets not forgot how he “delivered justice” in Chicago…Laquan McDonald Coverup, Mental Health Clinic Closures, School Closures…

    Reply
    1. flora

      Heh. Odd he didn’t title the piece: “It’s time to hold me accountable for helping American Elites avoid accountability for their abuses.” (no it’s not. that was a joke)

      Profile burnishing for the history books? Trying to rehabilitate himself to the public? I remember Robert McNamera wrote a mea culpa – ‘In Retrospect: The Tragedy and Lessons of Vietnam’ – about his role in ramping up the Vietnam war even when he knew it was unwinnable as it was being prosecuted. Didn’t change my opinion of McNamera.

      [McNamera] played a major role in escalating the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War.[3] McNamara was responsible for the institution of systems analysis in public policy, which developed into the discipline known today as policy analysis. – Wiki

      So, Rahm, how are Chicago’s public schools doing now?

      Reply
      1. flora

        Public schools are a major stepping stone up for poor and working class and middle class kids. So, Rahm, how are Chicago public schools doing now after your … uh… “careful” ministrations?

        Reply
        1. NotTimothyGeithner

          Rahm served as the White House point man for House elections in 1994 and 2010, so I think he knows a thing or two about helping Republicans win elections.

          Reply
        2. Watt4Bob

          IMHO, Rahm was sent to Chicago with one job, to destroy the teachers union, and thus pave the way for charter schools.

          Anything else he might accomplish in service to the donor class was just icing on their cake.

          What other option does he have at this point, but to engage in agressive historical revisionism?

          The Dims always revert to their “Hey, we’re the good guys” routine, I mean what are Rahm’s, or Biden’s options for that matter?

          They obviously can’t run on the truth of their respective records.

          Reply
          1. Michael Fiorillo

            You’re likely correct, and Obama was happy to have him do so, since he was beholden to school-privatizing interests from the very beginning of his career, primarily via his close relationship with Valerie Jarrett and the Joyce Foundation.

            Reply
    2. katenka

      Even with my long familiarity with his grasping, cowardly, self-serving temerity, I’ve been astonished to see the little essays himself has been generating lately. I think it’s pretty delightful that he seems to be of the view somehow that he can reinvent himself, or redefine himself ex post facto. I wish him the joy of it!

      Reply
      1. NotReallyHere

        Please don’t wish him joy or success in this endeavor. Even in derision those words have the power to frighten. I have no animosity towards the man personally but too many cynical grifters have managed to reinvent themselves in the past. This one should be laughed out of town, but that seems unlikely as both th NY Times and the Atlantic Magazine saw fit to gift him a platform. Truly mind boggling

        Reply
    3. grizziz

      Just another data point in my conviction that many(most?all?)successful career politicians are actors. Ready to read from any script if it will keep them in a role and on the stage.

      Reply
    4. Hana M

      The strangest people are getting religion these days–first Marco Rubio and now Rahm Emanuel! What a time to be alive.

      Reply
    5. chuck roast

      Back in the day when Rahm was O-Bee’s eminence grise, I was trying to get into a reading at Busboys and Poets on 14th and V in DC. I don’t recall who I went to see, but the line was out the door and the place was jammed. There are a couple of night clubs next door and as I was wandering around I peered into one. There was this little guy looking down at his phone. He looked up and our eyes met. It was Rahm! Oh, my heart was a-flutter! I was immediately reminded of the famous photograph of Goebbles

      What a creep.

      Reply
    6. Summer

      This is also the guy thay had to be dragged, kicking and screaming, to hold law enforcement accountable in Chicago.

      Reply
    7. ChiGal in Carolina

      That is a great article, written by Curtis Black, who has been on the beat forever (hung with him some back in the day). I hope NC links it tomorrow. Dry wit and a damning grasp of the facts.

      Rahm is an arrogant sob who will now become a talking head en route to amassing power and influence to embark on some new fu*kery. Thank God I don’t watch TV.

      Reply
  4. Carolinian

    Phoenix to Dallas–no snow perhaps but some major cities along the way including Tuscon and El Paso.

    And Moon shows how Uber’s drivers are gaming the system (Uber) that is trying to game us.

    Reply
  5. Pat

    Rahm Emanuel has always been first and foremost for Rahm Emanuel. Hence his current rewrite of history. (If you buy his version that he lobbied for banker prosecutions, please me. I have a bridge to sell you.) He sees the writing on the wall. The future opportunities for people supporting policies he held until very recently are disappearing. He is ‘banking’ on the 1% knowing that he is still one of them, but is making more populist noises, something he feels necessary to continue to be a talking head.

    And yeah, I do think Obama and Biden just got thrown under the bus, but in a manner that most won’t notice. You know all Obama had to work with the Republican minority to get anything done!!

    Reply
      1. Pat

        Shhh Slim, I want a buyer ‘discerning’ enough to buy an apartment in a Trump building. Willing to spend a bunch for cr*p. Your bridge is probably in better shape. But the fairy lights and faux gold leaf…

        Reply
    1. NotTimothyGeithner

      Rahm is on the Mayor Pete?!?! bandwagon. Rahm’s only way back to not working for Jonathan Chait (its not working for David Brooks, so there is that) is patronage, and Biden probably doesn’t remember Rahm from when he was Obama’s CoS as I doubt the former VP went to any important meetings.

      Reply
    2. clarky90

      Re; “It’s Time to Hold American Elites Accountable for Their Abuses”, Rahm Emanuel (!)…… What gives?”

      Widdershins. This is- “do and say the opposite” of your intention. It is an ancient formulaic spell, overlaid on everyday practices, used for summoning evil forces (demons and their ilk). It is beyond lying. It is “lying about everything” as an all-encompassing, conscious way of life.

      Ordinary people are relatively defenceless. We assume that “the cook didn’t spit in the soup, the mechanic replaced the nuts on the wheels……and the oxycontin is not addictive…”

      Madonna’s black-mass-performance at Eurovision for instance

      Reply
      1. richard

        Brazenness seems to be the first stop for big time sociopaths when they get called out. Those people I just murdered were murderers! Those black people I cheat, jail, mock and rob are endangering me! That nomination I stole didn’t lead me to the presidency. It was stolen from me!
        So much more all encompassing than a “lie”, you are right. This behavior has the same relation to a misstatement of fact that a mugger has to a wall street billionaire fraudster. There’s lying, and then there’s making it rain with gaslit madness, “lies” that deform whole civilizations.
        What do we even call that?

        Reply
        1. Lambert Strether Post author

          > Brazenness seems to be the first stop for big time sociopaths when they get called out.

          Well, Rahm is working for David Frum (, when the Bush administration was ginning up the case for war with Iraq). I’m sure they feel a bond.

          Reply
  6. NotReallyHere

    Rahm Emanuel…. are you family blog kidding me.

    Although he also wrote an opinion piece recently for The NY Times with the headline something like why Chicago leads the nation in police reform. So shame doesn’t seem to an emotion that affects him.

    A degree dance or something similarly acrobatic should be required to pull off these reality pirouettes. I hope he has one.

    Reply
    1. Kokuanani

      Is your comment about a “dance degree” made in jest? Because here’s Rahm’s CV, courtesy of Wikipedia:

      Rahm was encouraged by his mother to take ballet lessons, and is a graduate of the Evanston School of Ballet,[20] as well as a student of The Joel Hall Dance Center, where his children later took lessons.[21] He won a scholarship to the Joffrey Ballet,[22] but turned it down to attend Sarah Lawrence College,

      Reply
      1. NotReallyHere

        Yes i understood in addition to abandoning an actual dance career, his batchelor’s degree is in dance. Cos, you know if you want a career in dance what you do is turn down the opportunity to actually dance and opt instead to talk about it.

        BTW I respect any sincere individual who decides to take a dance degree. Why not, if that’s what the individual wants to do. I have no respect for Rahm Emmanuel. He’s a political machine toady who sets himself up as an instant expert on everything he sees and does, even his abject failures.

        As I said, shame doesn’t seem to be an emotion that burdens him and for that he deserves total derision.

        Reply
    1. Eureka Springs

      Thank you. I’m in over my head with blooming mock orange and knee deep in iris, peonies, roses and daisies now. This has been as beautiful a Spring as any I can remember.

      Reply
  7. Jim A.

    Re: Self driving for long-haul trucks. I have been saying for a long time that “self driving vehicles” will be ready for the interstates DECADES before they are ready for local streets. SDVs are still not as good as humans outside of “walled gardens,” but what they ARE good at is paying as much attention on hour 15 of their shift as they did on hour one. Given that, I believe truck stops serving as a place to either swap tractors (from crewed or uncrewed) or add drivers will be a thing.

    Reply
    1. crittermom

      It’s happening, to deliver mail.

      However, isn’t this a contradiction?
      First: (my emphasis)
      “The truck will have a safety engineer and driver on board to monitor vehicle performance and to ensure public safety.

      Then this:
      “TuSimple says long-haul routes with short turnaround times are well suited for self-driving trucks because they are normally accomplished with driving teams of two, which are challenging to recruit due to overnight driving requirements, the need to share close quarters and the truck driver shortage.”

      Sooo… if test runs go well, they’ll then have no drivers?

      Reply
  8. Sharkleberry Fin

    Former Amity Island Mayor, who just wants to keep the beaches open for the holiday despite the lurking Great White, Rahm Emanuel knows just what to say doesn’t he? Printer paper box full of Washington desk ephemera and Sox gear claiming to no one, “Man, you guys really f-ed-up,” on his way out the door.

    It wasn’t until this moment that I realized how manipulative and synthetic Emanuel is. But perhaps more startling is his lack of writing chops. Feh. A placeholding Chicago mayor is barely holding his place on the Atlantic’s masthead…wait, wait…anterograde amnesia. Rahm just woke up, remembers nothing, no memories, but sees “Tax Incremental Financing” tattooed on his thigh. [Am I running for office or is the office running from me?] The Atlantic calls. Felicity Huffman. Operation Iraqi Freedom. Collateralized debt obligations. “Are the Black-Eyed Peas still top of the charts?” asks Rahm, thinking, “Whatever. I need to find the elite man who raped and murdered my diabetic wife, America.”

    Reply
  9. David Carl Grimes

    Uber, Lyft drivers manipulate fares at Reagan National causing artificial price surges

    Reply
  10. Oregoncharles

    ““78% Consider Online Medical Sites Reliable””
    My personal, recent experience is that they’re not only more accessible and much cheaper (as in free), but more helpful than my doctor. And they don’t push surgery at me, or upcode me (right out of what Medicare would pay for – but they did correct it.)

    Admittedly, I don’t actually know whether the nutritional therapy I tried helped, or I just got lucky. But it was fairly inexpensive, pleasant (if you like beets), and didn’t hurt anything.

    OTOH, the ultrasounds my doctor ordered when I complained about heart arrhythmia proved reassuringly normal, which actually makes me feel better. Apparently it’s nerves, so I stocked up on calmative supplements I have experience with. Piled up some copays, but it could be much worse.

    One lesson learned: don’t let them rush you into surgery unless it’s unbearable and/or life threatening.

    Reply
    1. jrs

      online medical sites are a good way to scare oneself: omg these symptoms must be I have terminal cancer/rare disease/etc.!! I have a few months to live!!!

      Better to go to the doctor, if one is going to worry that way it better be for darn good reason i.e. a real medical diagnosis.

      As for the time wait for doctors, it’s not due to paperwork or I’ve never seen it due to that, it’s due to OVERBOOKING. But yes the waits for doctors are getting ridiculous, long waits to see a doctor, the lost work time, thus lost money etc..

      Reply
    2. Cal2

      Here’s a strategy to use: Hard copies.

      I want a disk with the image just taken. I want printed lab reports. I’ll wait a few minutes for them or you can mail them to my U.S. Postal mail box. Bills will only be paid after I receive hard copies.

      I don’t give a damn how inconvenient it is for the medial provider.
      No, I will not join your internet portal. I want to see a doctor face to face. If the office doesn’t want to take my cash on the spot, then bill me and wait for my bill to be paid with a check six months from now.

      “The systems is down, {nationwide}, we can’t view your latest X-ray.”
      “No problem, I have the disk right here.”
      “You are the man!” says the doctor.

      If you are drowning in medical debt, ask for an itemized statement of services. Then let the third party bill collector know that they are in violation of HIPAA. That gives the patient some leverage for negotiation.

      Reply
  11. Roger Smith

    AOC invokes “Rule of Law”. Oy! This brand of radicalized, know-it all-leftism (smug) is exactly why Sanders should not have capitulated to the DNC. His meekness called for and led to more extreme voices, and not in ways that bolster the weaker parts of his platform like foreign policy. Instead we have bright eyed fools jumping off cliffs, claiming the world will end in 12 years and that Trump should be impeached. AOC et. al. are closer to the opposite of the ZH commentariat and it makes the move forward all the much slower. Biden should be dead on arrival but the looney tunes antics of this bloc of politicians is going to push people away.

    Speaking of people stepping outside of sanity, ladies and gentleman, Justin Amash! Once a reliable ally on many important causes, this representative of my home state is stepping out and jumping the shark into the big world of Trump derangement syndrome, hoping to make a name for himself based off of nothing, rather than something. These weak efforts are only going to serve to make sure Trump remains, or that we get President *sniff sniff*, Joe Biden.

    Reply
  12. NotTimothyGeithner



    Random little factoid. Rahm Emanuel’s brother, Ari, is tight with Trump. Financially. Like, he used to be Trump’s agent.

    Wow!

    Reply
    1. flora

      From Charles Ferguson’s book “Predator Nation” :

      “Over the past quarter century, the leaders of both the Democratic and the Republican political parties have perfected a remarkable system for remaining in power while serving the new economic oligarchy. Both parties take in huge amounts of money, in many forms — campaign contributions, lobbying, revolving-door hiring, favours, and special access of various kinds.

      Politicians in both parties enrich themselves and betray the interests of the nation, including most of the people who vote for them. Yet both parties are still able to mobilize support because they skilfully exploit America’s cultural polarization. Republicans warn social conservatives about the dangers of secularism, taxes, abortion, welfare, gay marriage, gun control, and liberals.

      Democrats warn social liberals about the dangers of guns, pollution, global warming, making abortion illegal, and conservatives. Both parties make a public show of how bitter their conflicts are, and how dangerous it would be for the other party to achieve power, while both prostitute themselves to the financial sector, powerful industries, and the wealthy. Thus, the very intensity of the two parties’ differences on “values” issues enables them to collaborate when it comes to money.”

      Reply
        1. jsn

          Julius Nyerere, “the United States is also a one party state but, with typical American extravagance, it has two of them!”

          Reply
  13. OpenThePodBayDoorsHAL

    For all of the MMTérs, I’m with this guy. Time to set money free instead:

    When you persist with command-and-control top-down price fixing, no matter which formulae you use, you end up with spectacles like Mario Draghi’s $1 trillion QE. What happened in the face of such epic and unprecedented market manipulation (bond purchases)? German 10-year bund rates, in other words the cost of the money people actually have to use out in the economy, did not budge. Oops. So the hundreds of Ph.Ds with their incredibly sophisticated econometric models who helped Mario determine the potential outcomes were all one thing: wrong.

    Which is my point. It’s not possible to divine and then impose the “correct” price of money. Meantime you end up eviscerating savers, widening the rich/poor gap, lavishing money on speculators, and filling the economy with zombie companies.

    Reply
    1. Synoia

      “Set money free” from what exactly?

      So the hundreds of Ph.Ds with their incredibly sophisticated econometric models who helped Mario determine the potential outcomes were all one thing: Absolutely correct because there was liquidity.

      There is nothing organic or naturally occurring about money. It is a creation of the state.

      Reply
      1. OpenThePodBayDoorsHAL

        Set money free from the butcher’s thumb on the scale of the most important price in the world.

        “Liquidity”, sure, by pretending that a cool trillion in euros were created by sound lending and bank underwriting, subject to the inconvenient truths of creditworthiness and the ability to repay. Who needs those! Since Mama Central Bank can now wave her magic wand. Deus ex Machina! Mario bought anything that was not nailed down, BBB corporate credits from companies with one foot in the grave. So riddle me this: where does disconnecting debt issuance from the ability to repay lead? Seems to me that Capitalism without bankruptcy is like Catholicism without Hell. And when “ability to repay” can only be kept on life support when rates go to (and below) zero…does this mean that time preference has been repealed? That hurdle rates for investment need not exceed the risk-free rate? And savers should just be euthanized?

        And I would say that the world was run quite successfully for um oh a few thousand years using money that was *precisely* organic and naturally occurring. Including periods of the fastest economic growth and *improvements in the standards of living* the U.S. has ever experienced. Money that was emphatically and absolutely *not* a creation of the state: that’s the *entire* point.

        But we are Uber-mench now and can permanently defy the laws of gravity and physics. Reminds me of the incredibly smart and absolutely certain engineers and scientists in the control room at Chernobyl. Until the Bonfire of the Vanities arrives.

        Reply
        1. Jonathan Holland Becnel

          HBO has a new show out called ‘Chernobyl.’

          Its far and away the best show this year besides ‘Kidding’ starring Jim Carey.

          Regarding Chernobyl, the workers all showed true courage facing certain death post accident.

          Reply
          1. foghorn longhorn

            They certainly did
            And giant cement domes had to be built and a wide swatch of land vacared.
            But blow up four of em on the coast of the pacific, and meh
            Put that crap in some plastic bags and hello Olympics 2020

            Reply
  14. Synoia

    “The Ethical Quandary in Health Care Reform” [Scientific American]. “How can health care be made affordable for everyone in the United States, given the country’s preferential economic philosophy of free markets?

    What’s “ethical” about the quandary? A better question is “The Profitable Quandary in Health Care Reform”

    Reply
  15. ewmayer

    Re. Commodities: “An American chemicals company and an Australian miner want to build a new supply chain for rare earths that bypasses China.” — Did you catch the key snippet? Here, let me bold it for you: “The White House has been reluctant to impose tariffs on China’s rare-earths shipments, but China has slapped higher tariffs on American shipments of the unprocessed minerals.” IOW, the US has plenty of rare-earth domestic supply, but we’re shipping the raw materials across the pacific for processing in China and return shipment, having long ago offshored the processing capacity. As these materials are agreed to be strategically vital indistrial commodities, why not declare them so and invest some $billions of government monies into re-shoring the processing capability? Make a strategic investment, create a decent number of well-paying domestic jobs, what’s not to like? And I’ll bet with the cost of shipping first the ores westward across the Pacific and then the refined materials back eastward taken out of the equation, the resulting cost won’t be egregiously higher than currently. (And somewhat higher costs are not necessarily a bad thing, if they cause users to treat said commodities with the preciousness they deserve.) I realize, this sort of thinking might strike the Wall Street greedheads as verging dangerously close to that taboo, a “national industrial strategy and policy”….

    Reply
    1. Synapsid

      ewmayer,

      I agree with your point. I’d like to add that China is responsible for something like 95 percent of global production of rare earths.

      The US is still on the hook.

      Reply
    2. a different chris

      >Make a strategic investment, create a decent number of well-paying domestic jobs, what’s not to like?

      >I realize, this sort of thinking might strike the Wall Street greedheads as verging dangerously close to that taboo, a “national industrial strategy and policy

      That’s not the taboo at all. WS loves national policies, as long as they benefit them. Almost as strong as their love for money is their envied distaste of those who can actually lay bricks, fix a car, do some math that isn’t financially orientated. For those types of people to be “well paid”, well, that just can’t happen. So that’s the rub.

      Haha we were expected to sell them the rope. But that was not certain enough, we had to sell them the means to make the rope. And tell the rope-makers to get jobs as pizza makers or clean toilets.

      Reply
      1. Lambert Strether Post author

        > Haha we were expected to sell them the rope. But that was not certain enough, we had to sell them the means to make the rope. And tell the rope-makers to get jobs as pizza makers or clean toilets.

        Heh. This David Harvey YouTube is good too. It’s not so simple as “moving American jobs to China.” There was a lot of investment in China; Japan, Taiwan, Korea, etc. After al, the money has to go somewhere:

        Reply
    3. Dr. Robert

      There’s a good reason the processing is only done in China and Malaysia. Rare Earths are radioactive, some more than others, and some are poisonous. The ores tend to have a mix of the different elements. Processing and refining the ores is very dangerous and dirty work that would be expensive to do if you were to follow any sane or reasonable environmental and safety regulations. I suppose you could call this another sort of regulatory arbitrage.

      Reply
  16. chuck roast

    Back in the day when Rahm was O-Bee’s eminence grise, I was trying to get into a reading at Busboys and Poets on 14th and V in DC. I don’t recall who I went to see, but the line was out the door and the place was jammed. There are a couple of night clubs next door and as I was wandering around I peered into one. There was this little guy looking down at his phone. He looked up and our eyes met. It was Rahm! Oh, my heart was a-flutter! I was immediately reminded of the famous photograph of Goebbles

    What a creep.

    Reply
  17. Wukchumni

    When my Congressman goes out for Chinese, you can always be sure he’ll order pork…

    House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.) blocked a bipartisan attempt to limit Chinese companies from contracting with U.S. transit systems, a move that benefited a Chinese government-backed manufacturer with a plant in his district, according to multiple people familiar with the matter.

    His behind-the-scenes intervention came as Congress was trying this year to craft a spending compromise to avert another government shutdown. McCarthy pressed lawmakers to strip out language that could have prevented the company in his district, BYD Motors, from winning federal contracts, and they relented because they feared imperiling the bill.

    BYD Motors is a division of BYD Co., a giant Chinese manufacturer. Among other things, it makes electric buses that are often used by local governments. Stella Li, BYD Motors president, is a campaign contributor to McCarthy, and the lawmaker spoke at a ribbon-cutting for BYD’s California plant in 2017.

    Reply
  18. Summer

    Re: Many More Students, Especially the Affluent, Get Extra Time to Take the SAT” [Wall Street Journal].
    “In a lot of ways, this form of corruption is far worse than Varsity Blue. Not only is it far more pervasive, it perverts a system meant to help those who are genuinely disabled. “Accommodation,” forsooth. I bet there’s not one single minute these kids haven’t been “accommodated” in one way or another, all their lives. And all those Ivy League high flyers in the political class…”

    And gather the “accommodated” in one location and get:

    “How San Francisco broke America’s heart” [WaPo (DK)]. “Who can live on $15 an hour in this city transformed by innovation?… Downtown is a theme park of seismic start-ups — Uber, Airbnb, Slack and Lyft, with Twitter in the nearby Tenderloin, every app a skyscraper.” • What WaPo doesn’t and perhaps cannot (***cough*** Jeff Bezos ***cough***) say, is that Uber, Lyft, and AirBnB are all poster children for regulatory arbitrage, Uber and Lyft are not and never will be profitable, and that Uber is run by crooks.”

    They continue to be accommodated…
    Direct correlation.

    Reply
    1. Bernalkid

      Look at how many individuals are prescribed Ritalin or equivalent as well as the disabled testing relief and it is a chemically prescribed wall of privilege that confronts the normals, much less the underprivileged.

      Reply
  19. The Rev Kev

    Still have my copy of James Watson’s “The Double Helix” along with Francis Crick’s “What Mad Pursuit”. Rosalind Franklin did achieve a lot of recognition after her death and would likely have shared a Nobel prize if she had not passed away. The extent of her awards is a long one and she has become something of a cause célèbre with feminists-

    However it does not explain how Margaret Hamilton, who is still living, been awarded so little. –

    That list is pathetic compared to her achievements. Maybe she needs a “Hidden Figure” movie made about her life. It would be a good one.

    Reply
  20. George Phillies

    ” insects didn’t evolve in a bath of electromagnetic radiation, being protected by the atmosphere, so it stands to reason they’re at least vulnerable. ”

    Air is transparent to radio waves. The atmosphere does not protect insects from radio signals from outer space.

    Reply
  21. Cal2

    George, The sun sends energy across outer space and humans, and insects, have evolved with that. However, try a little localized blowtorch in your face, that’s the analogy of 5G.

    “[San Francisco ]has the lowest percentage of children, 13.4 percent, of any major American city, and is home to about as many dogs as humans under the age of 18.”

    That’s because of the city’s disastrous public schools and lack of private alternatives.

    Starting over 50 years ago, forced busing began. Dozens of superintendents, federal consent decrees, riots by Chinese parents who wanted their children not sacrificed on the altar of multiculturalism, etc. Now kids are sent all the way across town for “diversity.”

    If streets are dangerous and covered with feces, raving lunatics, drug addicts by the thousands, imagine what public transit is like? Care to put your child on the bus alone?

    “Chris Collier leaves his home in the Richmond District each morning long before sunrise — nearly two hours before school starts. The ninth-grader first takes a bus on Muni’s busiest line, the 38, more than 4 miles east to Van Ness Avenue and O’Farrell Street. There, he transfers to the 49 for the final 2 miles to John O’Connell High School in the Mission District.

    Chris, 14, had hoped to attend Washington High School, just half a mile from his home. But he did not get his top choice, or any of his choices in the district’s school-assignment system. And he has no one to drive him across town. So his commute takes 75 minutes, at best. When the 38 is overcrowded and he cannot squeeze in, he risks being late for his first-period English class.”

    This is an article from an organization that has steadfastly supported the civic decay in San Francisco city government. Imagine what a critic would write?

    San Francisco public schools are politicized crap. School children are politicized pawns in various sociological experiments that produce continual failure. That’s why there are so few children in the city.

    Reply
    1. Wukchumni

      I haven’t been to SF in a world of Sundays, but if it’s as ghastly as you make it out to be, why stay and suffer such indignities?

      Reply
      1. Cal2

        Kids are grown, no reason to go there except voluntarily, knowing the ins and outs, can avoid all the bad stuff, take advantage of the good.
        Hint, stay north of California Street.
        The goal is to keep the San Francisco political tumor from metastasizing to other places through education and to warn away starry-eyed younger people, unless of course they voluntarily submit to it.

        Notice the author of the article is from D.C. I’ll refrain from commenting on there, if she refrains from mouth piecing from afar the opinions of recently arrived carpetbaggers here.

        Nice ad field created by all that copy and those graphics in that article. :-)
        —————
        George, even Tucker Carlson is questioning the safety of 5G.

        Reply
      2. JBird4049

        Because it is their home? Just because it, and the rest of the Bay, has been transformed from a mostly working class area into something akin to the Global South, with an ever widening gap of the impoverished and the very well off, does not change that it is the home and often the birthplace of many natives who sometimes have roots going back a century or more.

        As one of those natives, I kinda wish that all the wealthy entitled jackasses, all the investors of empty homes, the venture capitalists, the techies, and heck the old monied families whose decisions caused a lot of the pain, would take their money and leave.

        Anyways, just where should anyone go? The well paying jobs with any future are being concentrated into smaller, and shrinking, pockets with any housing remotely affordable miles and hours away.

        Reply
        1. Wukchumni

          A Big Smoke once had clear advantages over towns that never grew up, think of all the cultural & sporting events, and the shopping possibilities, libraries bulging with titles, lots of ethnic food to choose from, et al.

          Really, tucker is about the only forbidden fruit not available to me, yeah I wish there was a neighborhood Thai restaurant, but there isn’t.

          Skirting certainly not endangered feces & squalor on the streets of San Francisco gets old quick, who’d accept that as a condition of living your life?

          Reply
            1. JBird4049

              Exactly. My (much, much) longer response got ate, but besides being to stubborn to be driven out by well off entitled asses from my home, there is nowhere else really to go to. Thirty, even ten years ago there were places in Northern California where there was housing matching jobs that could pay enough. Now? No, for where there are jobs, the rents are far too high, and where there are affordable rents, there are no jobs. Further, the commutes from the housing to the jobs are… excessively long as in multiple hours one way.

              Shrug.

              Reply
  22. Wukchumni

    Last year’s thinning out of little green apples netted a 5 gallon bucket worth, maybe around 25% more this go round.

    As I was practicing spanned parenthood in the Game of Pomes, I thought to myself that the Sansa was way too close to the Akane being a cross of it and the Gala, intrigue comes with the territory.

    Reply
  23. Carolinian

    For those who aren’t tired of the topic this is very interesting. Emilia Clarke is interviewed about acting, her character, the ending. She’s quite articulate.

    Reply
  24. Phil

    Regarding articles about the effects of cell phones on insects, here are a couple to start with. Full text of each is available online for free:

    Sharma, V.P. and N.R. Kumar. 2010. Changes in honeybee behaviour and biology under the influence of cellphone radiations. Current Science Vol.98 No.10 pp.1376-1378 Available .

    Thielens, Arno et al. 2018. Exposure of Insects to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields from 2 to 120 GHz. Scientific Reports volume 8, Article number: 3924. Available .

    Reply
  25. dk

    The Bruenigs Interview the Gravel Teens

    Nothing earth-shattering, but nice to hear this new cohort explain themselves.

    “If Gravel makes it to the debates, it’s not because of us, it’s because of sixty-five thousand people people who donated, and however many people how still have land-lines said yes on a poll.” (21:27)

    Reply

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