How Saudi Money Keeps the US at War in Yemen

Yves here. One theme in comments over the last two weeks is how l’affaire Kavanaugh is having the convenient effect of diverting attention from US-perpetrated or supported atrocities, like the war in Yemen, which has produced mass starvation and cholera. This post is a wee effort to address this imbalance.

By Ben Freeman, the director of the at the Center for International Policy (CIP). Originally published at .

It was May 2017. The Saudis were growing increasingly nervous. For more than two years they had been relying heavily on U.S. military support and bombs to defeat Houthi rebels in Yemen. Now, the Senate was considering a bipartisan to cut off military aid and halt a big sale of bombs to Saudi Arabia. Fortunately for them, despite mounting evidence that the , supplied, and air campaign in Yemen was , the Saudi government turned out to have just the weapon needed to keep those bombs and other kinds of aid coming their way: an army of lobbyists.

That year, their forces in Washington included members of more than two dozen lobbying and public relations firms. Key among them was Marc Lampkin, managing partner of the Washington office of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck (BHFS), a company that would be paid nearly half a million dollars by the Saudi government in 2017. from the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) show that Lampkin ed Senate offices more than 20 times about that resolution, speaking, for instance, with the legislative director for Senator Tim Scott (R-SC) on May 16, 2017. Perhaps coincidentally, Lampkin making a $2,000 contribution to the senator’s political action committee that very day. On June 13th, along with a majority of his fellow senators, Scott to allow the Saudis to get their bombs. A year later, the type of bomb authorized in that sale has been used in air strikes that have killed civilians in Yemen.

Little wonder that, for this and his other lobbying work, Lampkin earned a spot on the “Top Lobbyists 2017: Hired Guns” compiled by the Washington publication the Hill.

Lampkin’s story was anything but exceptional when it comes to lobbyists working on behalf of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It was, in fact, very much the norm. The Saudi government has hired lobbyists in profusion and they, in turn, have effectively helped convince members of Congress and the president to ignore blatant human rights violations and civilian casualties in Yemen. According to a forthcoming report by the program, which I direct, at the Center for International Policy, registered foreign agents working on behalf of interests in Saudi Arabia ed Congressional representatives, the White House, the media, and figures at influential think tanks more than 2,500 times in 2017 alone. In the process, they also managed to contribute nearly $400,000 to the political coffers of senators and House members as they urged them to support the Saudis. Some of those contributions, like Lampkin’s, were given on the same day the requests were made to support those arms sales.

The role of Marc Lampkin is just a tiny sub-plot in the expansive and ongoing story of Saudi money in Washington. Think of it as a striking tale of pay-to-play politics that will undoubtedly be revving up again in the coming weeks as the Saudi lobby works to block new Congressional to end U.S. involvement in the disastrous war in Yemen.

A Lobby to Contend With

The roots of that lobby’s rise to prominence in Washington lie in the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. As you may remember, with 15 of those 19 suicidal hijackers being citizens of Saudi Arabia, it was hardly surprising that American public opinion had soured on the Kingdom. In response, the worried Saudi royals spent around over the next decade to improve such public perceptions and retain their influence in the U.S. capital. That lobbying facelift proved a success until, in 2015, relations soured with the Obama administration over the Iran nuclear deal. Once Donald Trump won the presidency, however, the Saudis saw an unparalleled opportunity and launched the equivalent of a full-court press, an aggressive campaign to the newly elected president and the Republican-led Congress, which, of course, cost real money.

As a result, the growth of Saudi lobbying operations would prove extraordinary. In 2016, according to , they reported spending just under $10 million on lobbying firms; in 2017, that number had nearly tripled to $27.3 million. And that’s just a baseline figure for a far larger operation to buy influence in Washington, since it doesn’t include considerable sums given to or think tanks like the , the , and the (to mention just a few of them).

This meteoric rise in spending allowed the Saudis to dramatically increase the number of lobbyists representing their interests on both sides of the aisle. Before President Trump even took office, the Saudi government signed a deal with the , a lobbying firm headed by Howard “Buck” McKeon, the recently retired Republican chairman of the House Armed Services Committee. His firm also Lockheed Martin, one of the top providers of to the Kingdom. On the Democratic side, the Saudis inked a $140,000-per-month with the Podesta Group, headed by Tony Podesta, whose brother John, a long-time Democratic Party operative, was the former chairman of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign. Tony Podesta later dissolved his firm and has been investigated by Special Counsel Robert Mueller for serving as an unregistered foreign agent.

And keep in mind that all this new firepower was added to an already formidable arsenal of lobbying outfits and influential power brokers, including former Republican Senate Majority Leader , who, according to Lee Fang of the , was “deeply involved in the [Trump] White House hiring process,” and former Senator , of the pro-Republican Super PAC American Action Network. All told, during 2017, Saudi Arabia inked 45 different with FARA-registered firms and more than 100 registered as Saudi foreign agents in the U.S. They proved to be extremely busy. Such activity reveals a clear pattern: Saudi foreign agents are working tirelessly to shape perceptions of that country, its royals, its policies, and especially its grim war in Yemen, while simultaneously working to keep U.S. weapons and military support flowing into the Kingdom.

While the term “foreign agent” is often used as a synonym for lobbyist, part of the work performed by the Kingdom’s paid representatives here resembles public relations activity far more than straightforward lobbying. For example, in 2017, Saudi foreign agents reported ing media outlets more than 500 times, including significant outreach to national ones like the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and PBS, which has aired about the Kingdom. Also included, however, were smaller papers like the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and more specialized outlets, even , in hopes of encouraging positive stories.

The Kingdom’s image in the U.S. clearly concerned those agents. Still, the lion’s share of their activity was focused on security issues of importance to that country’s royals. For example, Saudi agents ed officials at the State Department, which oversees most commercial arms transfers and sales, nearly 100 times in 2017, according to FARA filings. Above all, however, their focus was on Congress, especially members with seniority on key committees. As a result, at some point between late 2016 and the end of 2017, Saudi lobbyists ed more than 200 of them, including every single Senator.

The ones most often dealt with were, not surprisingly, those with the greatest leverage over U.S. relations with Saudi Arabia. For example, the office of Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC), who sits on both the appropriations and armed services committees, was the most ed, while that of Senator Chris Coons (D-DE) was the top Democratic one. (He sits on the appropriations and foreign relations committees.)

Following the Money from Saudi Arabia to Campaign Coffers

Just as there’s a clear pattern when it comes to ing congressional representatives who might help their Saudi clients, so there’s a clear pattern to the lobbying money flowing to those same members of Congress.

The FARA documents that record all foreign-agent political activity also list campaign contributions reported by those agents. Just as we did for political activities, the Foreign Influence Transparency Initiative program conducted an analysis of all campaign contributions reported in those 2017 filings by firms that represented Saudi interests. And here’s what we found: more than a third of the members of Congress ed by such a firm also received a campaign contribution from a foreign agent at that firm. In total, according to their 2017 FARA filings, foreign agents at firms representing Saudi clients made $390,496 in campaign contributions to congressional figures they, or another agent at their firm, ed on behalf of their Saudi clients.

This flow of money is best exemplified by the 11 separate occasions we uncovered in which a firm reported ing a congressional representative on behalf of Saudi clients on the same day someone at the same firm made a campaign contribution to the same senator or House member. In other words, there are 10 other cases just like Marc Lampkin’s, involving foreign agents at Squire Patton Boggs, DLA Piper, and Hogan Lovells. For instance, Hogan Lovells meeting with Senator Bob Corker (R-TN) on behalf of the Royal Embassy of Saudi Arabia on April 26, 2017, and that day an agent at the firm made a $2,700 contribution to “Bob Corker for Senate 2018.” (Corker would later decide not to seek reelection.)

While some might argue that contributions like these look a lot like bribery, they turn out to be perfectly legal. No law bars such an act, and while it’s true that foreign nationals and foreign governments are from making contributions to political campaigns, there’s a simple work-around for that, one the Saudis obviously made use of big time. Any foreign power hoping to line the pockets of American politicians just has to hire a local lobbyist to do it for them.

As Jimmy Williams, a former lobbyist, : “Today, most lobbyists are engaged in a system of bribery, but it’s the legal kind.”

The Saudi Lobby Today

Fast forward to late 2018 and that very same lobby is now fighting vigorously to defeat a House that would end U.S. support for the Saudi war in Yemen. They’re flooding congressional offices with their requests, in effect asking Congress to ignore the more than who have died in Yemen, the that have been the cause of many of those deaths, and a civil war that has led to a of al-Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, or AQAP. They’ll probably mention Secretary of State Mike Pompeo’s recent “” that the Saudis are now supposedly taking the necessary steps to prevent more civilian casualties there.

What they’re not likely to mention is that his decision was driven by the head of the legislative affairs team at the State Department who just happens to be a former with BGR Government Affairs, one of 35 FARA working for Saudi Arabia at this moment. Such lobbyists and publicists are using the deep pockets of the Saudi royals to spread their , highlighting the charitable work that government is doing in Yemen. What they fail to emphasize, of course, are the Saudi blockade of the country and the American-backed, armed, and fueled air strikes that are killing civilians at , , , and other civilian events. All of this is, in addition, helping to create a grotesque , a potential disaster of the most extreme sort and the very reason such humanitarian assistance is needed.

In the end, even if the facts aren’t on their side, the dollars are. Since September 2001, that reality has proven remarkably convincing in Washington, as copious dollars flowed from Saudi Arabia to U.S. military contractors (who are selling weapons to that country), to lobbying firms, and via those firms directly into Congressional coffers.

Is this really how U.S. foreign policy should be determined?

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10 comments

  1. Carolinian

    Clearly Putin’s mistake is that he hasn’t been bribing, er, lobbying enough Congresspeople. It’s all well and good to go on about “our American partners” however the legislators are looking for a more concrete token of friendship. As Warren Beatty says to a petitioner in Bullworth: “but you haven’t given any money to my campaign.”

    Starting a few generously funded think tanks in DC would also be useful.

    1. Ginavon

      So does anyone know why President Trump is saying….Saudi Arabia is going to have to pay for protection? Perhaps because the US petrol dollar is about to die? FYI…The whole LOOK AT RUSSIA…RUSSIA DID IT is designed to keep you from noticing what CHINA has been doing and what DIANE Fiendsten has been doing WITH CHINA.

  2. Ashburn

    The Saudis, the UAE, and Israel have far greater influence over our democracy than most media or Congress cares to admit. The focus on Russia is a convenient distraction.

  3. Roger Smith

    This post is a wee effort to address this imbalance.

    Thank you Yves. The hullabaloo over this shameful SCOTUS nonsense (by everyone) and the most recent protests is disgusting. Meanwhile I am reading reports that some in Yemen are so starved that they have resorted to boiling leaves and eating leaf paste. The last meaningful Yemen news I had heard prior to that was a while back from Moon, prior to the key port town being moved in on by the Saudi coalition. Does anyone know if they managed to take it?

    That year, their forces in Washington included members of more than two dozen lobbying and public relations firms. Key among them was Marc Lampkin, managing partner of the Washington office of Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck (BHFS), a company that would be paid nearly half a million dollars by the Saudi government in 2017. Records from the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA) show that Lampkin ed Senate offices more than 20 times about that resolution, speaking, for instance, with the legislative director for Senator Tim Scott (R-SC) on May 16, 2017. Perhaps coincidentally, Lampkin reported making a $2,000 contribution to the senator’s political action committee that very day. On June 13th, along with a majority of his fellow senators, Scott voted to allow the Saudis to get their bombs. A year later, the type of bomb authorized in that sale has reportedly been used in air strikes that have killed civilians in Yemen.

    Where are the protestors? Here are two different offices that should have mobs outside of them.

    For example, in 2017, Saudi foreign agents reported ing media outlets more than 500 times, including significant outreach to national ones like the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, and PBS, which has aired multiple documentaries about the Kingdom. Also included, however, were smaller papers like the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and more specialized outlets, even ESPN, in hopes of encouraging positive stories.

    But remember those “Russian” memes!? The article arrives at the truth, our government is operated by crooks, sellouts, and foreign entities via legalized bribery. I wonder how hired hits are still considered illegal if this is not. It is an interesting conundrum. How can we change the laws to prevent this when the people with the power to do so benefit from it, besides total collapse? I wish the Founders had thought of this, although it is entirely possible that, even with all their own flaws, they never thought people could be as selfishly and fatally incompetent as to leverage the entire existence of the Republic on some short term monetary gains.

    1. Ginavon

      NY TIMES is currently owned by GEORGE SOROS and the x President of Mexico…two fine gentlemen who are to be wholly trusted?
      FYI……President Trump announced in Sept of 2018 that September is national preparedness month. In October 2018 President Trump ran a test of the emergency system…perhaps the president, who has the highest security clearances in the world knows something we don’t?

  4. Rod

    So many of those former political newsmakers mentioned as foreign agents for SA.
    Politics in America surely provides sooooooooo(ie) much opportunity in and out of office.
    My two Senators take the money. And we all send Col. Lindsey a USAF Retirement check each month.

  5. Tomonthebeach

    One has to wonder why Middle East terrorists are not concentrating on blowing up K Street. (Just not Bells’ Liquor store okay?)

    1. Whiskey Bob

      They’re focused on the proxy war between Sunni and Shia (to oversimplify a complex scenario.) The Saudis are sponsoring theirs to attack their targets. Of course blowbacks happen and they end up attacking elsewhere.

  6. Jack Gladney's TA

    This story reminds me of what the late Alexander Cockburn said about the changing meaning of the Latin word suffragium. In the Roman republic, it meant a vote. In the Roman empire, it meant a favor and, as the political system continued to decay, it simply meant a bribe.

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